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joe biden goes head to head with congressman paul ryan in the vice presidential debate. of course, our anticipation is heightened by the loss that the champ took in round one on wednesday night. president obama pulled a lot of his punches in his debate with governor romney, so if the original strategy was for biden to go in with a soft touch against paul ryan, we can be sure that that is going out the window. he is coming out swinging. gloves off. now, romney was able to dodge blows against his economic plan because actually there's not much of a plan there to jab at. take his strategy for economic recovery, to fill the revenue gap for a result from tax cuts is an exercise in shadow boxing futility. he hasn't yet told us what it is he's planning to do. but by hitching his wagon to paul ryan and endorsing ryan's budget plan, he attached himself to clearly articulated policy and a record that leaves the whole ticket exposed to attack which gives joe biden an opening to hit romney so hard -- to hit ryan so hard that mitt romney is going to feel it too. from the sound of it, the vice presi
. on thursday, vice president joe biden and congressman paul ryan tried to make the case for the respective ticket's tax plans, take a look. >> our entire premise of these tax reform plans is to grow the economy and create jobs. it's plan estimated to create 7 million jobs. now, we think that government taking 28% of a family and business's income is enough. >> okay. those answers weren't exactly full of detail, so let me see if i can help them out. mitt romney would cut all tax rates by 20% and reduce the top tax rate from 35% to 28%. he'd eliminate taxes on capital gains, repeal the alternative minimum tax and estate tax and cut the top corporate tax rate from 35% to 25%. on the other hand president obama would keep tax rates the same for those making less than $250,000. he'd also raise the top two tax brackets to 36% and 39.6% and he has supported the buffet rule. he'd restore the estate tax but lower the corporate tax rate to 28% from 35%. so the choice is yours, undecided voter. but i see a clear distinction with one candidate supporting the rich, the other the middle and working class
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)